canada to push \'plastics charter\' at g7: mckennacanada to push \'plastics charter\' at g7: mckennacanada to push \'plastics charter\' at g7: mckenna

by:Yucai     2020-01-02
Canada will use its position as chairman of the Group of Seven (G7) to try to convince the world\'s richest and most industrialized countries to achieve ambitious goals in plastic recycling and waste reduction.
\"What we see is a zero. plastics-
Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said Wednesday in Cancun, Mexico, where she attended the International Conference on the world\'s oceans.
Earlier this year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau first came up with the idea of a plastic charter.
The group of seven will meet in Quebec on June.
McKenna said plastic chartered cars could go further than the EU\'s plan to recycle at least half of its plastic packaging by 2030.
In a telephone interview with Canadian media, she said: \"We can build on goals such as 100 reusable, recyclable or compost packaging . \".
She said it was time to take action.
Large multinational companies such as coca
Coca-Cola and Unilever have been working to bring all plastic packaging to these requirements by 2030.
\"Businesses, environmental activists and other governments are motivated to take concrete action on plastic and to exclude it from the ocean.
Canada will also try to persuade other countries to ban the use of beads.
Small pieces of plastic found in products such as toothpaste and shower gel.
McKenna hopes not only to generate interest in the G7, but also to generate interest in the G20 countries on a wider scale.
She suggested that industrialized countries could help other countries improve their waste management.
We know that more support is needed from developing countries.
\"Consumer and business education may also be part of the solution.
For example, enterprises can be encouraged to adopt standard packaging in order to make recycling easier.
How to achieve the goal of zero plastic waste will depend on individual countries, says McKenna.
In Canada, the federal government can provide resources to municipalities to improve recycling.
\"We can also help drive change.
\"Plastic waste in the ocean is becoming a major environmental issue.
It is estimated that as many as 8 million tons of plastic flow into the world\'s oceans every year --
Equivalent to about 630 billion single-
Use plastic water bottles.
Canadians have contributed their share.
It is estimated that nearly 3 billion plastic bags are used in Canada every year.
Not only are the oceans threatened.
In 2014, a study by the Ontario government found up to 6.
The Ontario lake near Toronto has 7 million plastic grains per square kilometer.
Louis Porta, the environmental organization that participated in the Mexican conference in the north of the ocean, said Canada\'s efforts were welcome.
Other countries and businesses are looking for people to move forward on this issue, he said.
\"Without leadership, we could lose the momentum to bring these entities together,\" he said . \".
\"They are willing to come to the table, but someone has to create this table.
Porta says any plastic charter needs to serve the big industrial economies and the most troubled developing countries.
Canada, which has big cities and small remote communities, is in the lead, he said.
\"If you can find a solution to work in the Arctic, you can find a solution to work in the South Pacific. \" —
Following @ row1960 on Bob Weber\'s twitter, PressCanada, Canada, will take advantage of its presidency of the Group of Seven, trying to convince the world\'s richest and most industrialized countries to adopt ambitious goals in plastic recycling and waste reduction.
\"What we see is a zero. plastics-
Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said Wednesday in Cancun, Mexico, where she attended the International Conference on the world\'s oceans.
Earlier this year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau first came up with the idea of a plastic charter.
The group of seven will meet in Quebec on June.
McKenna said plastic chartered cars could go further than the EU\'s plan to recycle at least half of its plastic packaging by 2030.
In a telephone interview with Canadian media, she said: \"We can build on goals such as 100 reusable, recyclable or compost packaging . \".
She said it was time to take action.
Large multinational companies such as coca
Coca-Cola and Unilever have been working to bring all plastic packaging to these requirements by 2030.
\"Businesses, environmental activists and other governments are motivated to take concrete action on plastic and to exclude it from the ocean.
Canada will also try to persuade other countries to ban the use of beads.
Small pieces of plastic found in products such as toothpaste and shower gel.
McKenna hopes not only to generate interest in the G7, but also to generate interest in the G20 countries on a wider scale.
She suggested that industrialized countries could help other countries improve their waste management.
We know that more support is needed from developing countries.
\"Consumer and business education may also be part of the solution.
For example, enterprises can be encouraged to adopt standard packaging in order to make recycling easier.
How to achieve the goal of zero plastic waste will depend on individual countries, says McKenna.
In Canada, the federal government can provide resources to municipalities to improve recycling.
\"We can also help drive change.
\"Plastic waste in the ocean is becoming a major environmental issue.
It is estimated that as many as 8 million tons of plastic flow into the world\'s oceans every year --
Equivalent to about 630 billion single-
Use plastic water bottles.
Canadians have contributed their share.
It is estimated that nearly 3 billion plastic bags are used in Canada every year.
Not only are the oceans threatened.
In 2014, a study by the Ontario government found up to 6.
The Ontario lake near Toronto has 7 million plastic grains per square kilometer.
Louis Porta, the environmental organization that participated in the Mexican conference in the north of the ocean, said Canada\'s efforts were welcome.
Other countries and businesses are looking for people to move forward on this issue, he said.
\"Without leadership, we could lose the momentum to bring these entities together,\" he said . \".
\"They are willing to come to the table, but someone has to create this table.
Porta says any plastic charter needs to serve the big industrial economies and the most troubled developing countries.
Canada, which has big cities and small remote communities, is in the lead, he said.
\"If you can find a solution to work in the Arctic, you can find a solution to work in the South Pacific. \" —
Following @ row1960 on Bob Weber\'s twitter, PressCanada, Canada, will take advantage of its presidency of the Group of Seven, trying to convince the world\'s richest and most industrialized countries to adopt ambitious goals in plastic recycling and waste reduction.
\"What we see is a zero. plastics-
Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said Wednesday in Cancun, Mexico, where she attended the International Conference on the world\'s oceans.
Earlier this year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau first came up with the idea of a plastic charter.
The group of seven will meet in Quebec on June.
McKenna said plastic chartered cars could go further than the EU\'s plan to recycle at least half of its plastic packaging by 2030.
In a telephone interview with Canadian media, she said: \"We can build on goals such as 100 reusable, recyclable or compost packaging . \".
She said it was time to take action.
Large multinational companies such as coca
Coca-Cola and Unilever have been working to bring all plastic packaging to these requirements by 2030.
\"Businesses, environmental activists and other governments are motivated to take concrete action on plastic and to exclude it from the ocean.
Canada will also try to persuade other countries to ban the use of beads.
Small pieces of plastic found in products such as toothpaste and shower gel.
McKenna hopes not only to generate interest in the G7, but also to generate interest in the G20 countries on a wider scale.
She suggested that industrialized countries could help other countries improve their waste management.
We know that more support is needed from developing countries.
\"Consumer and business education may also be part of the solution.
For example, enterprises can be encouraged to adopt standard packaging in order to make recycling easier.
How to achieve the goal of zero plastic waste will depend on individual countries, says McKenna.
In Canada, the federal government can provide resources to municipalities to improve recycling.
\"We can also help drive change.
\"Plastic waste in the ocean is becoming a major environmental issue.
It is estimated that as many as 8 million tons of plastic flow into the world\'s oceans every year --
Equivalent to about 630 billion single-
Use plastic water bottles.
Canadians have contributed their share.
It is estimated that nearly 3 billion plastic bags are used in Canada every year.
Not only are the oceans threatened.
In 2014, a study by the Ontario government found up to 6.
The Ontario lake near Toronto has 7 million plastic grains per square kilometer.
Louis Porta, the environmental organization that participated in the Mexican conference in the north of the ocean, said Canada\'s efforts were welcome.
Other countries and businesses are looking for people to move forward on this issue, he said.
\"Without leadership, we could lose the momentum to bring these entities together,\" he said . \".
\"They are willing to come to the table, but someone has to create this table.
Porta says any plastic charter needs to serve the big industrial economies and the most troubled developing countries.
Canada, which has big cities and small remote communities, is in the lead, he said.
\"If you can find a solution to work in the Arctic, you can find a solution to work in the South Pacific. \" —
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